With the aim of driving awareness and growth around shaping Smart Places, we are asking leading voices in the global resilience ecosystem to contribute to this discussion by sharing their insights, vision and future-forward methodologies to create Resilience in Cities.

Impacts on people and economic assets from extreme weather and natural hazards occur at different scales and on different timescales. The good news is that water risks and their impact can be reduced by taking measures and making changes in processes, practices, systems and structures that respond to both global and local contexts. These entail combining adaptation, mitigation and disaster management through climate resilient strategies, master planning and infrastructure.

 

About Resilience in Cities Our Insights and Inspiration

 

Using advanced risk modelling to understand risk and inform insurance

Rowan Douglas CBE, Head of Capital, Science & Policy Practice at Willis Towers Watson, says that, for insurers and reinsurers, it is a real focus to understand and evaluate extreme weather and climate risks now and into the future by using advanced risk modelling. He adds, “Critically, that knowledge can be shared with consumers, both domestic and commercial, to help society understand the requirements for coverage in order to achieve a satisfactory level of resilience.”

 

“As soon as risk becomes identified, it cannot be ignored. It has to be managed. And it’s going to be the modelled world that is the mechanism through which this route to resilience is mediated and delivered.” 

Rowan Douglas CBE, Head of Capital, Science & Policy Practice, Willis Towers Watson


RECOVER, ADAPT, RECONFIGURE – TOWARDS RESILIENT SYSTEMS & ASSETS

To enhance resilience at local and global scales, holistic visions are needed to create the Smart Places of the future. Marjolein Dohmen-Janssen, Managing Director at the 4TU Center for Resilience Engineering, says that multinationals and infrastructure operators must have an integral view of how global supply chains and related systems are connected. “Inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary collaboration is therefore essential in working towards climate resilience.”

 

“Resilient organisations are able to recover from a shock, and then adapt and reconfigure in such a way that they can better deal with extreme weather or climate change events in the future.” 

Marjolein Dohmen-Janssen, Managing Director at the 4TU Center for Resilience Engineering


UNDERSTANDING THE IMPACTS OF WEATHER FOR RESILIENT BUSINESS OPERATIONS

Climate Resilience is essential for people, society, economy and infrastructure. Menno Bom, Director at Infoplaza, says that the increasing need for Climate Resilience is prompting businesses and infrastructure operators to adopt innovative digital solutions to improve their operational efficiencies. “By giving insights into weather details and making the impact of the weather visible, we are able to help our clients mitigate risks related to their business continuity.”

“Digital services improve real-time forecasting to give businesses a clear understanding of the impact and eventual risks of weather events, and help to define 'workability weather windows' for more resilient and efficient business operations.” 

Menno Bom, Director at Infoplaza


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RESILIENCE IS OUR BEST HUMAN CAPITAL

Henk Ovink, Dutch Special Envoy for International Water Affairs to the United Nations, and the first Water Ambassador of the Netherlands, says that Resilience is our best human capital in the context of climate change and natural disasters.

"It is really about our learning capacity and the way in which we look ahead and prepare ourselves for an uncertain future."

Watch Henk’s vlog on ‘Resilience in Cities’ here; and view his interview on ADB's Fast Talk about scaling up financing for water security, enhanced resilience and sustainable growth.

“In the context of the Sustainable Development Goals and an uncertain future, it is our preparedness, learning capacity and innovation that will determine our Resilience.” 

Henk Ovink, Dutch Special Envoy for International Water Affairs to the United Nations, and the first Water Ambassador of the Netherlands


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Resilience in cities is about liveability

Dr Vladan Babovic, Professor in Hydroinformatics at the National University of Singapore, observes that resilience is closely linked to the concepts of both liveability and adaptability. He says, “We have to create nature-inspired solutions that will provide resilience for society. In nature, it's perfectly normal to adapt – and we have to find adaptable solutions that deal with the uncertainties with which we are faced.”


“Digital services, which are already evident in every aspect of our lives, are critical to enhancing resilience in our society.” 

Dr Vladan Babovic, Professor in Hydroinformatics at the National University of Singapore