Flood alleviation embracing architecture

A major flood alleviation project in the city of Elgin (Moray, Scotland) has led to a wider channel for the river Lossie as well as a series of walls and embankments. The incorporation of these works in the vicinity of the Elgin Cathedral required a replacement longer-span bridge of architectural merit, but one that would not compete with the historic context. Now a bare necessity for safety has been turned into an opportunity for the city and its inhabitants.
Landshut Bridge | Royal HaskoningDHV

The new 60 meters two-span arch bridge is used by vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians. The use of two spans enables the twin constraints of vertical alignment of the carriageway and clearance of the predicted flood level to be met whilst at the same time providing a low rise, elegant structure which is complimentary with its surroundings and will not detract from the cathedral. The arches which span the river rise from below the level of the deck, helping to reduce the construction height of the new bridge. By using a T shaped, varying profile for the arches, the spans become slightly asymmetrical: the bridge has a connotation with a bird rising from the water surface.
Landshut Bridge | Royal HaskoningDHV
Landshut Bridge | Royal HaskoningDHV

To establish good proportions between the length and width of the new Landshut Bridge, the arches separate the carriageway and the footways/ cycle lanes. An additional advantage of this arrangement is a significant reduction in the height of the deck. By using transparent parapets the “wings” have been observed completely. The new Landshut Bridge has silver, light grey and mid grey colours.
Landshut Bridge | Royal HaskoningDHV
Landshut Bridge | Royal HaskoningDHV
Landshut Bridge | Royal HaskoningDHV

ClientMoray CouncilPeriod2008 - 2014
LocationElgin, Scotland, U.K.ServicesArchitecture, Landscape Design, Urban Design, Structural Design, Project management, Flood alleviation
Scopetwo-span steel bridges, span 75 metres, width 16 metresTeamFreerk Hoekstra, Jorge Moura, Joris Smits, Barbara Hellett, David Bone, Mark Palmer and Filipa Vieira Santos