Royal HaskoningDHV was selected for the restoration works for Shell’s historic headquarters in the Netherlands. C30 is a cultural heritage building and was listed as a national monument in 1993. The style of building, which was inspired by the Renaissance and 17th-Century Dutch classicism, is characteristic of the work of well-known architects, the Nieukerken brothers.

Restoring C30 | Royal HaskoningDHV

 

In April 2015, major restoration work began on the oldest Shell building in the Netherlands – the headquarters at Carel van Bylandtlaan 30, The Hague in the Netherlands, fondly known as C30.

This year, it is 100 years since Shell established its headquarters in the building as Bataafsche Petroleum Maatschappij – and as such the building is designated as a national monument of huge historical significance and important architectural impact.

After nearly a century, the exterior of C30 was showing serious signs of decay due to the effects of weather. On behalf of Shell Real Estate, Royal HaskoningDHV was selected to conduct a feasibility study for the restoration works, as well as the total design, tendering, move management, project management, site management and site supervision, including Health, Safety and Environment.Our initial inspection of the outside of the building revealed extensive damage. In order to restore the building to its original state, major restoration work was required. As Shell wanted to continue to occupy the building for many years to come it was important to ensure that this restoration work would last well into the future.

C30 is a cultural heritage building in the Netherlands and was listed as a national monument in 1993. The style of building, which was inspired by the Renaissance and 17th-Century Dutch classicism, is characteristic of the work of well-known architects, the Nieukerken brothers.

Throughout the project, it was vital that we kept and protected all of the historical elements of the building whilst maintaining the safety of some 150 employees at the building site during construction works. Another main challenge was to create a building site that didn’t look like one!

Strict supervision on housekeeping was key, as the building represents Shell globally and we wanted to reduce the inconvenience for employees and visitors, as well as for people living in the local neighbourhood. To enable this, Shell created a custom-made wrapping (2,000m²) around the scaffold on the front side of the building. This also had the added benefit of allowing Shell to use this as positive exposure for the local environment.

Bas Snelder, site construction manager for Royal HaskoningDHV, commented on the complexity of the project: “We tackled the whole exterior of the building; cleaning, repairing and filling cracks in the façade. We also fitted new guttering and the slates and lead and zinc work on the roof – which covers an area of around 7,000m² – have all been replaced. We paid special attention to restoring the stone anchors and lead finials, as well as decorative features on dormer windows. Some of the finials were missing or had been subject to significant weather damage. Some of the wrought-iron cladding anchors were rusted so the rust was removed and they were re-painted. In total, an area of around 7,000m² for the roof and 9,700m² of the facade has been refurbished.”

Facts:

  • 9,700m² facade
  • 7,000m² roof
  • 2,250 windows
  • 53km battens
  • 7,000m² foil
  • 70,000kg lead
  • 8,000kg zinc
  • 251,000 slates