Elgin Flood Alleviation Scheme

The largest of the Moray framework schemes is an £86million scheme to alleviate flooding in Elgin. Elgin is one of Scotland’s oldest towns and has suffered from a number of floods in the past. The 1997 flood was estimated to have caused up to £80million worth of damage.

The detailed design for the scheme proposed works along 9km of the River Lossie, creating a conveyance corridor through the town and opening up the existing flood plain downstream. Works involved replacing three bridges, one of which is an architect designed innovative double arch construction. Around 40 businesses were relocated so that property could be demolished to make space for the flood corridor.

The Tyock Burn tributary was identified as a mechanism for extensive flooding in the town. The design incorporates a 1.5km diversion of this burn in a new embanked channel to a confluence with the Lossie. This diversion intercepts a burn which is a high designation fish spawning watercourse. A new water treatment feature within the Tyock diversion to capture any contaminated particulate matter mitigates against it damaging this habitat.

In total over a third of a million cubic metres of material will be excavated, sorted and either utilized within the scheme or disposed off-site. Due to previous land uses along the riparian corridor a number of sites were found to be contaminated. The cost estimate for land fill of material excavated from these sites was £5m. Instead, a sustainable solution has been implemented of on-site remediation and re-use to provide an improved recreation area for the community.

Construction commenced in April 2011 and is due to complete in May 2015. The project is currently forecast to be delivered on time and under budget.